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Best Texas Sheet Cake Recipes

Best Texas Sheet Cake Recipes



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Top Rated Texas Sheet Cake Recipes

Attend any church, funeral, potluck or barbecue charity event in the South and it’s likely you will find squares of Texas sheet cake (also known as “cowboy cake”) on the dessert table. The beauty of this cake is in its unpretentious ingredients that can be found in most kitchen pantries: flour, vanilla, butter, cocoa powder, sugar, buttermilk and eggs.You’ll need a “baker’s pan” — a 13-by-18-inch pan. If you don’t have one, a jelly roll pan will do.


Peanut Butter Texas Sheet Cake recipe by Smith's Chef Jeff

Cake for breakfast? Yes please! This is the perfect recipe for that.

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Cops Say He Killed Himself During a Traffic Stop. His Family Says It’s Murder.

Photo Illustration by Sarah Rogers/The Daily Beast / Photos Courtesy Hermena BumpassAt 12:26 a.m. on Dec. 15, 2019, J’Mauri Bumpass, 18, texted his sister from a McDonald’s in Durham, North Carolina. Five minutes later, he told her he was on his way to pick her up at his mother’s house. “Get dressed,” he wrote. Eight minutes after that, and less than a mile from his home, a Durham County Sheriff’s Office patrol car flashed its lights and pulled him over.Deputy Anthony Sharp, 33, and his trainee Robert Osborne, 30, noticed “fictitious tags” on Bumpass’ car, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Bumpass was driving a Chevrolet Impala. But his license plate belonged to a Honda Accord he previously drove and had traded in, according to his family, who say he was waiting on the title for his new car to come in the mail.What happened next is, depending on who you ask, either another case of law enforcement brazenly shooting an unarmed Black man—or a tragic case of death by suicide during a seemingly routine traffic stop. In the Sheriff’s Office version of events, Bumpass stopped the car and shot himself in the head before Sharp and Osborne even began to approach him. But scant evidence, seemingly inconsistent statements, and a lack of transparency have led his family to conclude something far more sinister.Deciphering what happened is complicated by the Durham Sheriff’s Office’s refusal to release incident reports or video footage of the incident, as well as a federal lawsuit by Bumpass’ family that makes dramatic allegations about murder, tampered evidence, and a cover-up operation.In this case, the law enforcement agency under scrutiny is led by a self-styled reformer of color. Still, the family believes the worst, a testament to just how deeply frayed trust is in police around the country.Black Chief: My Heart Jumps When I See a Cop Car Behind Me“They killed my son,” Hermena Bumpass, the late teenager’s mother, told The Daily Beast, repeating the claim in her lawsuit. “They had to kill my son. My son would not commit suicide.”In the lawsuit filed by Bumpass’ family and their attorney, Allyn Sharp, against Deputy Sharp (no relation), Osborne, and other members of the Durham County Sheriff’s Office, they allege that members of the department shot and killed him, deliberately hid evidence, made false statements, and selectively shared information that made the suicide seem likely.None of the officers named in the suit responded to requests for comment from The Daily Beast. A spokeswoman for the Durham County Sheriff’s Office declined to comment on specific questions, citing the lawsuit, but said that neither Sharp nor Osborne nor any other deputy “fired their weapon nor in any other way caused the death of J’Mauri Bumpass.”What is clear is that the Sheriff’s Office’s story about what happened that night has evolved over time.In an initial release on Dec. 15, 2019, the agency said Bumpass’ car hit a power pole during the stop, that EMS arrived, and that he was taken to a nearby emergency room, where he was pronounced dead. Three days later, another release said “preliminary autopsy results” showed Bumpass “died as the result of a ‘close-range gunshot wound, consistent with suicide.’”His mother suggested the suicide claim came out of nowhere and never added up to her.Her son was known for his infectious smile, work with community groups, good grades, and love for his siblings, she said. He was working at FedEx while preparing to apply to college and study sports medicine. He had no prior criminal history and no history of depression or mental health issues, according to his family. A Daily Beast review of North Carolina Department of Public Safety records confirmed he did not appear to have a criminal record.A toxicology report prepared by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Raleigh obtained by The Daily Beast also revealed no drugs found in his system or any evidence of previous substance abuse. Bumpass said she’d also never seen her son with a gun before and wasn’t aware of him having access to one.“My son wouldn’t have killed himself,” Bumpass told The Daily Beast. “No way.”Cario Hope, Bumpass’ childhood friend and high school classmate, had the same reaction. He said Bumpass was the most positive person he knew, the kind of friend you could always count on for a smile when times were hard.“It couldn’t be possible to me. I could never see him doing something like that. He was on the right track,” he said. “It didn’t make sense for him to do something like that over something so small.”Suspicions over what really happened to Bumpass only increased, his mother said, after a slow drip of puzzling details came out about the seemingly simple traffic stop through court orders, meetings between his family and members of the Sheriff’s Office, and an independent investigation by their attorney. The latter probe referenced incident reports, officers’ statements, and radio communications that the Durham County Sheriff’s Office declined to share and which The Daily Beast has not been able to independently verify.According to the lawsuit, Osborne initially called in the stop of Bumpass as a suspicious car but later said in an alleged incident report referenced in the suit that the stop was for fictitious tags. After Bumpass’ car hit the pole, the suit says, Sharp called for backup, stating there was a “subject on foot.” He allegedly requested K-9 units to help establish a perimeter and specifically asked for Deputy Sheriff Brent Crider to come to the scene, according to alleged radio communications quoted in the lawsuit.Crider, 35, did not respond to a request for comment.Sharp and Osborne did not approach the car until backup arrived, the lawsuit says. When they did, the incident report quoted in the lawsuit says Sharp found a man lying torso down in the car with a desert tan Glock in between his legs with the barrel expelling smoke “as if it had just been fired.”Richard Rivera, a New Jersey police director and former expert witness, said that after learning about the allegations in the lawsuit, he wouldn’t rule anything out. “When we’re talking about policing, anything is possible.”Still, he said, his experience tells him it is plausible that Bumpass became freaked out before the traffic stop and killed himself, even if the details surrounding his death are “weird.”But he said the rampant speculation about what happened would easily be cleared up if the Durham County Sheriff’s Office were transparent about everything they know and everything that was documented that night. “They need to be forthcoming. This family deserves some closure,” Rivera said. “The Sheriff’s Office shouldn’t have this stigma hanging over them as well and shouldn’t allow for people to speculate. Just come clean and be transparent.”If the lawsuit and its claims sometimes stretch credulity, some details about the strange episode are clearer.A report from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Raleigh, obtained by The Daily Beast, said that as Sharp and Osborne exited their cars for the traffic stop, “they heard a shot fired and the vehicle sped off, crashing and rolling over.”The report said Bumpass was found with a gunshot wound to the head and a gun nearby. He was removed “after the scene was deemed safe and the firearm removed from the vehicle” the report said, and taken to the local emergency department, where he was transferred to the ICU in critical condition. He was pronounced dead at 5:50 a.m.A separate autopsy report from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Raleigh said the cause of death was a gunshot wound to the head. It reported a bullet entering the right side of his head and exiting the left side after being shot from a “slightly frontward” direction. The report also noted abrasions on Bumpass’ forehead, his right eye, both his cheeks, and on his knees.“It is our opinion that the cause of death is a gunshot wound to the head,” the report said. “The manner of death is classified as suicide.”But the family lawsuit alleges other oddities, such as that at least one investigator from the Durham County Sheriff’s Office on the case, 39-year-old Ryan Lounsberry, “expressed concerns” about the changing narratives and the blood spatter evidence in the car. Lounsberry, who no longer works for the agency, did not respond to repeated requests for comment.Bumpass said video evidence would clear everything up for her, but she said the Sheriff’s Office has never produced any. “If you can show me that my son picked up a gun and shot himself in the head,” Bumpass said, “I’ll walk away and accept that. But nobody could look me in the face and tell me that.”A spokeswoman for the Durham County Sheriff’s Office said body cameras were not used by the department in 2019. However, Sharp’s patrol car was equipped with a dash camera the day of the traffic stop. The spokeswoman declined to say why footage was never produced.The family lawsuit alleges the video was never produced because Sharp and members of the Sheriff’s Office deliberately hid it.According to the lawsuit, one day after Bumpass’ death, a tech employee in the Sheriff’s Office reported the wiring to Sharp’s dash camera uploading system had been damaged and covered with black electrical tape. Sheriff Clarence Birkhead, 61, allegedly told the family later in court that an outside company taped the wiring during a repair in July 2019. But when shown a photo of the state of the wires, the repair company, Piedmont Communications, allegedly told Bumpass’ attorney that it would never leave the wires exposed like that.Birkhead did not respond to a request for comment. Piedmont Communications also did not respond to a request for comment.According to the lawsuit, when the family questioned Jimmy Butler, 53, the Sheriff’s Office captain of investigations, about why the electrical tape was never removed to see if the wires were cut, he declined to speak about it.A man picked up a phone associated with Butler but hung up and did not respond to further requests for comment from The Daily Beast.According to the Sheriff’s Office’s general orders obtained by The Daily Beast, officers are required at the beginning of a shift to make sure their dash camera and microphones work. Before making a traffic stop, they’re also required to make sure the in-car system is recording audio and video. Either way, audio and video recording automatically begins when an officer’s lights are activated, the general orders state.The Durham County Sheriff’s Office declined to answer specific questions about the wiring of the camera in Sharp’s car.Rivera, who is currently the police director of the Penns Grove Police Department in New Jersey, said he has had his own issues with department servers and video evidence in the past. But he also said those issues always have to be documented internally and explained.“As police, we have to document everything. We have to justify our actions. We have to keep reports,” he said. “Yet we have access to this information and material and we don’t want to share it. It’s nonsensical.”Bumpass and her attorney initially pushed for an independent investigation into the incident by the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation. But in a Feb. 4, 2020, letter obtained by The Daily Beast, the agency declined to review the “suicide investigation” because “the incident has been investigated by a competent law enforcement agency.” The agency also cited the amount of time that had passed since the initial incident occurred, which at that point was 51 days.Bumpass said she’d been disappointed in the lack of clear answers and information, particularly from Sheriff Birkhead. Birkhead, who is Black, overwhelmingly won his 2018 election to office. His campaign website pledged “leadership that is transparent, accessible and accountable.” He also pledged to “share timely and accurate information” with the public.But Bumpass said the lack of details surrounding the death of her son has led her and her family and his friends to conclude that either Sharp or Osborne killed her son. “Nobody could come up to a conclusion where they could feel comfortable saying J’Mauri committed suicide,” she said.Even so, she conceded she was still unsure of a possible motive for the alleged murder. An independent investigation by her attorney, Allyn Sharp, charted out a possible one in the lawsuit—but although Bumpass thinks it's plausible, she isn't entirely certain about it. (Sharp did not respond to multiple requests for comment.)The lawsuit cites records that Deputy Sharp had previously arrested two distant cousins of J’Mauri on drug charges in Aug. 4, 2016, and March 29, 2017, and alleges Sharp made comments saying he knew the Bumpasses were running a “drug ring” and vowed to take them down. The two men at the center of the previous arrests, Timothy Bumpass Jr., 28, and Timothy Bumpass Sr., 50, did not respond to requests for comment.Federal court records show that Bumpass Sr. had previously been incarcerated for drug-related charges in the past and was arrested for a violation of probation on March 29, 2017, by the Durham County Sheriff’s Office. But the records do not specify the names of the officers involved in the arrest. According to federal court records, Bumpass Sr. was sentenced to five years in prison for the probation violation in November 2018.North Carolina Department of Public Safety records show Bumpass Jr. was arrested on drug possession and trafficking charges in Durham County on Aug. 4, 2016. According to local news reports, Bumpass Jr. was arrested again by the Durham County Sheriff’s Office on Aug. 4, 2017, for leaving the scene of an accident and attempting to elude police. The reports do not specify the names of the officers involved in the arrest.Bumpass said the men were cousins on the side of her son’s father, whom she divorced years before the incident, and that despite their being relatives, neither she nor her son had ever met them.Fraught as the saga is, and as unsure as she may be of why police would have taken her son’s life, her goal now is a simple one.“I want justice,” she said. “I want these officers to be convicted. I want the truth to come out.”Hope said he just wants to know how his friend died. “I want to know what really happened, because I don’t believe what they’re telling us,” he told The Daily Beast.New Video of Ronald Greene Arrest in Louisiana Is Just BrutalAfter watching recent reports of Black men like Ronald Greene being killed by police who later reportedly attempted to alter the facts of what happened in official narratives, Bumpass said she hasn’t stopped thinking about her son’s death and wants it to be recognized. “Nobody knows about Durham, North Carolina, going through the same thing they just went through with George Floyd,” she said.But mostly, she added, she wants the idea that her son killed himself over a simple traffic stop to be stricken from the record of his life.“I want that off of my son’s name.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

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Recipe Summary

  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon almond extract
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ cup butter
  • ¼ cup milk
  • 4 ½ cups confectioners' sugar
  • ½ teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

In a large saucepan, bring 1 cup butter and water to a boil. Remove from heat, and stir in flour, sugar, eggs, sour cream, 1 teaspoon almond extract, salt, and baking soda until smooth. Pour batter into a greased 10x15-inch baking pan.

Bake in the preheated oven for 20 to 22 minutes, or until cake is golden brown and tests done. Cool for 20 minutes.

Combine 1/2 cup butter and milk in a saucepan bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Mix in sugar, and 1/2 teaspoon almond extract. Stir in pecans. Spread frosting over warm cake.


Best Texas Sheet Cake

In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking soda, and salt. Whisk together. Set aside.

Measure out milk in a liquid measuring cup. Add vinegar OR lemon juice and stir together. Set aside.

In a small saucepan, combine water, butter, and cocoa powder. Whisk over medium-high heat until butter is melted.

Bring to a boil and then pour over flour mixture. Whisk together just until combined.

Add milk mixture, vanilla, and eggs. Whisk just until combined.

Spray a jelly roll pan (13x18 half sheet pan) with non-stick cooking spray. Spread cake batter into pan. Bake 15-18 minutes. DO NOT OVER BAKE! The key to this recipe is to not over bake the cake. I take it out of the oven when an inserted toothpick comes out somewhat clean but not completely dry.

Cool completely then frost with chocolate frosting.

In a large bowl, combine softened butter and cocoa powder. Mix until combined.

Add powdered sugar, starting with 4. cups. Mix until combined.

Add milk, starting with 1/4 cup, and vanilla. Mix until combined.

Add a little more powdered sugar or milk until you get the desired consistency.

Notes

Just a reminder, do not over bake this cake. I've had this cake when it's over baked and it's dry and not great. When baked just enough, or maybe even "underbaked" just a little bit, this is the best cake ever.

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About Me

Hi Recipe Lovers! My name is Valerie. I am the owner of Crust Club and I love all things food! This blog is where I share all of my family favorite recipes that we can't make into products at Crust Club. Whether it's through these recipes or our food at Crust Club, my goal is to feed my family, really good, really easy-to-make food.


Recipe Summary

  • 24 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ½ cup plus 1 Tbsp. unsweetened cocoa
  • 2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup sour cream, at room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup plus 2 Tbsp. milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 pound confectioners' sugar
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts

Preheat oven to 375°F. Mist a 15-by-11-inch sheet pan with cooking spray. Combine 16 Tbsp. butter, 5 Tbsp. cocoa and 1 cup water in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring. Remove from heat.

In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking soda and salt. Stir in cocoa mixture, then sour cream and eggs. Spread batter evenly in pan. Bake until a skewer comes out clean, about 22 minutes.

To make icing, combine 8 Tbsp. butter, milk and 1/4 cup cocoa in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring. Remove from heat add vanilla. Gradually whisk in confectioners' sugar.

Smooth icing onto hot cake sprinkle with nuts. Cool on a wire rack. Cut into 24 pieces and serve, or chill in an airtight container.


PASSED DOWN FROM ONE GENERATION TO THE NEXT

The particular sheet cake recipe you’ll find here is not the same one that sat upon my Aunt Suzy’s countertop, but rather, one from a well-versed Texas baker, Fran Murr.

The original recipe Fran used in her South Texas bakery was passed down by her mother. It was their family’s go-to dessert for school and church functions. The family recipe had all of the core Original Texas Sheet Cake recipe components — a fudgy sheet cake made with cocoa, buttermilk, and pecans — however, Fran made an adjustment during her bakery days that took their family’s recipe to the next level.

BUTTERMILK AND COFFEE FOR MORE FLAVOR

She added brewed coffee to their family’s original Texas Sheet Cake recipe. A wise decision from a wise baker. The coffee did not necessarily add a pronounced coffee flavor to the cake, but rather enhanced the flavor of the chocolate. The addition of the coffee in combination with the buttermilk made for an incredibly tender crumb.

Acidic ingredients like buttermilk and coffee in baked goods help to break down long gluten strands, keeping your cake from being tough, and at the same time, adding flavor. You can read more about buttermilk in baked goods in this article from FineCooking.com.


Texas Sheet Cake

  • Skill Level: Easy
  • Add to favorites

  • Prep Time : 10m
  • Cook Time : 20m
  • Ready In : 30m

Texas Sheet Cake

Texas Sheet Cake – ingredients and method

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 cup water
  • 5 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 6 tablespoons milk
  • 5 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 4 cups confectioners' sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Method

Step 1

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 10x15 inch pan.

Step 2

Combine the flour, sugar, baking soda and salt. Beat in the sour cream and eggs. Set aside. Melt the butter on low in a saucepan, add the water and 5 tablespoons cocoa. Bring mixture to a boil then remove from heat. Allow to cool slightly, then stir cocoa mixture into the egg mixture, mixing until blended.

Step 3

Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake in the preheated oven for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

Step 4

For the icing: In a large saucepan, combine the milk, 5 tablespoons cocoa and 1/2 cup butter. Bring to a boil, then remove from heat. Stir in the confectioners' sugar and vanilla, then fold in the nuts, mixing until blended. Spread frosting over warm cake.


The Best Texas Sheet Cake

Everything is bigger in Texas! Especially this Texas sheet cake. It is sinfully good!

Ingredients

  • FOR THE CAKE:
  • 2 cups Sugar, Plus 2 Tablespoons
  • 2 cups Flour
  • 1 teaspoon Baking Soda
  • ½ teaspoons Salt
  • 2 whole Eggs
  • ½ cups Sour Cream
  • 1 cup Butter, Softened
  • ⅓ cups Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
  • 1 cup Water
  • _____
  • FOR THE FROSTING:
  • 1 stick Butter, Softened
  • 7 cups Powdered Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla
  • ¼ cups Evaporated Milk
  • 4 Tablespoons Unsweetened Cocoa Powder

Preparation

Stir together the sugar, flour, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl. With a mixer, mix in your eggs and sour cream and beat on low. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat and add in the cocoa and water and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and slowly add the hot mixture into the sugar/flour mixture mixing on low.

Pour the batter into a lightly greased jelly roll pan (12名). Bake for 18-20 minutes at 375F. Let the cake cool for about 10-15 minutes before frosting.

For the frosting, soften the butter in the microwave for about 30 seconds if not already at room temperature. Slowly beat the powdered sugar, vanilla, evaporated milk, and cocoa powder into the melted butter until smooth. Spread frosting over the cooled sheet cake with a knife. Served best with vanilla ice cream.


Texas Sheet Cake

  • Skill Level: Easy
  • Add to favorites

  • Prep Time : 10m
  • Cook Time : 20m
  • Ready In : 30m

Texas Sheet Cake

Texas Sheet Cake – ingredients and method

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 cup water
  • 5 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 6 tablespoons milk
  • 5 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 4 cups confectioners' sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Method

Step 1

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 10x15 inch pan.

Step 2

Combine the flour, sugar, baking soda and salt. Beat in the sour cream and eggs. Set aside. Melt the butter on low in a saucepan, add the water and 5 tablespoons cocoa. Bring mixture to a boil then remove from heat. Allow to cool slightly, then stir cocoa mixture into the egg mixture, mixing until blended.

Step 3

Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake in the preheated oven for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

Step 4

For the icing: In a large saucepan, combine the milk, 5 tablespoons cocoa and 1/2 cup butter. Bring to a boil, then remove from heat. Stir in the confectioners' sugar and vanilla, then fold in the nuts, mixing until blended. Spread frosting over warm cake.


Peanut Butter Texas Sheet Cake recipe by Smith's Chef Jeff

Cake for breakfast? Yes please! This is the perfect recipe for that.

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French police chase down and kill 'radicalised' man who walked into police station and stabbed officer

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The list of Donald Trump associates who have attempted to bring down the former president is as long as it is varied: from his lawyer, to his closest advisor, his ex-wife and his alleged lover. But like many powerful figures before him, it may well be his accountant that would be his undergoing. Allen Weisselberg, the little-known 73-year-old chief financial officer for the Trump Organisation, has worked for the Trump family as far back as the early 1970s under Donald’s father Fred. Some say he is closer to Mr Trump than he is to his own children. As one former employee put it, “he knows where the bodies are buried". In recent weeks New York prosecutors investigating Mr Trump’s tax affairs have been turning the screws on Mr Weisselberg in the hope of flipping him to testify against his boss. Cyrus Vance, the Manhattan District Attorney, is looking into everything from hush-money payments paid to women on Mr Trump's behalf, to property valuations and employee compensation. Speculation is mounting that his office may be able to turn Mr Weisselberg, who has not been accused of any wrongdoing, as it pulls together a grand jury to decide whether to indict.

Matt Gaetz said Americans have an 'obligation' to take up arms against Silicon Valley companies, claiming they're trying to cancel conservatives

Conservatives including Gaetz have long accused technology companies of being ideologically biased against them.

Bill and Melinda Gates might shake up their charity to protect it after their divorce, which could include bringing in outside directors, according to a report

Melinda French Gates is said to have pushed for governance changes at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to protect it following the divorce.

GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski slammed Mitch McConnell for trying to block the Capitol riot commission for 'short-term political gain'

Murkowski is one of the few GOP senators supporting the commission. McConnell reportedly asked GOP senators to vote against it as a "personal favor."

Philippines halts deployment of workers to Saudi Arabia

The Philippines has suspended the deployment of workers to Saudi Arabia after it received reports that their employers and recruiters were making them pay for COVID-19 testing, quarantine and insurance upon arrival in the kingdom. Labour Secretary Silvestre Bello said in a May 27 order that his department will issue an official statement on resumption of deployment "after this matter has been clarified accordingly". It was not immediately clear how many Filipinos bound for Saudi Arabia would be directly affected.

Ryanair says Belarus refused pilot's request to contact airline

Belarusian air traffic control refused a request by a Ryanair pilot to contact the airline after being told of an alleged bomb threat, leaving him with no alternative but to land in Minsk, the Irish carrier said in a letter seen by Reuters. Belarus scrambled a warplane on Sunday and used the bomb alert, which turned out to be fictitious, to divert the flight, which was en route from Greece to Lithuania. When it landed in Minsk, a dissident journalist and his girlfriend were arrested.

Cops Say He Killed Himself During a Traffic Stop. His Family Says It’s Murder.

Photo Illustration by Sarah Rogers/The Daily Beast / Photos Courtesy Hermena BumpassAt 12:26 a.m. on Dec. 15, 2019, J’Mauri Bumpass, 18, texted his sister from a McDonald’s in Durham, North Carolina. Five minutes later, he told her he was on his way to pick her up at his mother’s house. “Get dressed,” he wrote. Eight minutes after that, and less than a mile from his home, a Durham County Sheriff’s Office patrol car flashed its lights and pulled him over.Deputy Anthony Sharp, 33, and his trainee Robert Osborne, 30, noticed “fictitious tags” on Bumpass’ car, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Bumpass was driving a Chevrolet Impala. But his license plate belonged to a Honda Accord he previously drove and had traded in, according to his family, who say he was waiting on the title for his new car to come in the mail.What happened next is, depending on who you ask, either another case of law enforcement brazenly shooting an unarmed Black man—or a tragic case of death by suicide during a seemingly routine traffic stop. In the Sheriff’s Office version of events, Bumpass stopped the car and shot himself in the head before Sharp and Osborne even began to approach him. But scant evidence, seemingly inconsistent statements, and a lack of transparency have led his family to conclude something far more sinister.Deciphering what happened is complicated by the Durham Sheriff’s Office’s refusal to release incident reports or video footage of the incident, as well as a federal lawsuit by Bumpass’ family that makes dramatic allegations about murder, tampered evidence, and a cover-up operation.In this case, the law enforcement agency under scrutiny is led by a self-styled reformer of color. Still, the family believes the worst, a testament to just how deeply frayed trust is in police around the country.Black Chief: My Heart Jumps When I See a Cop Car Behind Me“They killed my son,” Hermena Bumpass, the late teenager’s mother, told The Daily Beast, repeating the claim in her lawsuit. “They had to kill my son. My son would not commit suicide.”In the lawsuit filed by Bumpass’ family and their attorney, Allyn Sharp, against Deputy Sharp (no relation), Osborne, and other members of the Durham County Sheriff’s Office, they allege that members of the department shot and killed him, deliberately hid evidence, made false statements, and selectively shared information that made the suicide seem likely.None of the officers named in the suit responded to requests for comment from The Daily Beast. A spokeswoman for the Durham County Sheriff’s Office declined to comment on specific questions, citing the lawsuit, but said that neither Sharp nor Osborne nor any other deputy “fired their weapon nor in any other way caused the death of J’Mauri Bumpass.”What is clear is that the Sheriff’s Office’s story about what happened that night has evolved over time.In an initial release on Dec. 15, 2019, the agency said Bumpass’ car hit a power pole during the stop, that EMS arrived, and that he was taken to a nearby emergency room, where he was pronounced dead. Three days later, another release said “preliminary autopsy results” showed Bumpass “died as the result of a ‘close-range gunshot wound, consistent with suicide.’”His mother suggested the suicide claim came out of nowhere and never added up to her.Her son was known for his infectious smile, work with community groups, good grades, and love for his siblings, she said. He was working at FedEx while preparing to apply to college and study sports medicine. He had no prior criminal history and no history of depression or mental health issues, according to his family. A Daily Beast review of North Carolina Department of Public Safety records confirmed he did not appear to have a criminal record.A toxicology report prepared by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Raleigh obtained by The Daily Beast also revealed no drugs found in his system or any evidence of previous substance abuse. Bumpass said she’d also never seen her son with a gun before and wasn’t aware of him having access to one.“My son wouldn’t have killed himself,” Bumpass told The Daily Beast. “No way.”Cario Hope, Bumpass’ childhood friend and high school classmate, had the same reaction. He said Bumpass was the most positive person he knew, the kind of friend you could always count on for a smile when times were hard.“It couldn’t be possible to me. I could never see him doing something like that. He was on the right track,” he said. “It didn’t make sense for him to do something like that over something so small.”Suspicions over what really happened to Bumpass only increased, his mother said, after a slow drip of puzzling details came out about the seemingly simple traffic stop through court orders, meetings between his family and members of the Sheriff’s Office, and an independent investigation by their attorney. The latter probe referenced incident reports, officers’ statements, and radio communications that the Durham County Sheriff’s Office declined to share and which The Daily Beast has not been able to independently verify.According to the lawsuit, Osborne initially called in the stop of Bumpass as a suspicious car but later said in an alleged incident report referenced in the suit that the stop was for fictitious tags. After Bumpass’ car hit the pole, the suit says, Sharp called for backup, stating there was a “subject on foot.” He allegedly requested K-9 units to help establish a perimeter and specifically asked for Deputy Sheriff Brent Crider to come to the scene, according to alleged radio communications quoted in the lawsuit.Crider, 35, did not respond to a request for comment.Sharp and Osborne did not approach the car until backup arrived, the lawsuit says. When they did, the incident report quoted in the lawsuit says Sharp found a man lying torso down in the car with a desert tan Glock in between his legs with the barrel expelling smoke “as if it had just been fired.”Richard Rivera, a New Jersey police director and former expert witness, said that after learning about the allegations in the lawsuit, he wouldn’t rule anything out. “When we’re talking about policing, anything is possible.”Still, he said, his experience tells him it is plausible that Bumpass became freaked out before the traffic stop and killed himself, even if the details surrounding his death are “weird.”But he said the rampant speculation about what happened would easily be cleared up if the Durham County Sheriff’s Office were transparent about everything they know and everything that was documented that night. “They need to be forthcoming. This family deserves some closure,” Rivera said. “The Sheriff’s Office shouldn’t have this stigma hanging over them as well and shouldn’t allow for people to speculate. Just come clean and be transparent.”If the lawsuit and its claims sometimes stretch credulity, some details about the strange episode are clearer.A report from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Raleigh, obtained by The Daily Beast, said that as Sharp and Osborne exited their cars for the traffic stop, “they heard a shot fired and the vehicle sped off, crashing and rolling over.”The report said Bumpass was found with a gunshot wound to the head and a gun nearby. He was removed “after the scene was deemed safe and the firearm removed from the vehicle” the report said, and taken to the local emergency department, where he was transferred to the ICU in critical condition. He was pronounced dead at 5:50 a.m.A separate autopsy report from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Raleigh said the cause of death was a gunshot wound to the head. It reported a bullet entering the right side of his head and exiting the left side after being shot from a “slightly frontward” direction. The report also noted abrasions on Bumpass’ forehead, his right eye, both his cheeks, and on his knees.“It is our opinion that the cause of death is a gunshot wound to the head,” the report said. “The manner of death is classified as suicide.”But the family lawsuit alleges other oddities, such as that at least one investigator from the Durham County Sheriff’s Office on the case, 39-year-old Ryan Lounsberry, “expressed concerns” about the changing narratives and the blood spatter evidence in the car. Lounsberry, who no longer works for the agency, did not respond to repeated requests for comment.Bumpass said video evidence would clear everything up for her, but she said the Sheriff’s Office has never produced any. “If you can show me that my son picked up a gun and shot himself in the head,” Bumpass said, “I’ll walk away and accept that. But nobody could look me in the face and tell me that.”A spokeswoman for the Durham County Sheriff’s Office said body cameras were not used by the department in 2019. However, Sharp’s patrol car was equipped with a dash camera the day of the traffic stop. The spokeswoman declined to say why footage was never produced.The family lawsuit alleges the video was never produced because Sharp and members of the Sheriff’s Office deliberately hid it.According to the lawsuit, one day after Bumpass’ death, a tech employee in the Sheriff’s Office reported the wiring to Sharp’s dash camera uploading system had been damaged and covered with black electrical tape. Sheriff Clarence Birkhead, 61, allegedly told the family later in court that an outside company taped the wiring during a repair in July 2019. But when shown a photo of the state of the wires, the repair company, Piedmont Communications, allegedly told Bumpass’ attorney that it would never leave the wires exposed like that.Birkhead did not respond to a request for comment. Piedmont Communications also did not respond to a request for comment.According to the lawsuit, when the family questioned Jimmy Butler, 53, the Sheriff’s Office captain of investigations, about why the electrical tape was never removed to see if the wires were cut, he declined to speak about it.A man picked up a phone associated with Butler but hung up and did not respond to further requests for comment from The Daily Beast.According to the Sheriff’s Office’s general orders obtained by The Daily Beast, officers are required at the beginning of a shift to make sure their dash camera and microphones work. Before making a traffic stop, they’re also required to make sure the in-car system is recording audio and video. Either way, audio and video recording automatically begins when an officer’s lights are activated, the general orders state.The Durham County Sheriff’s Office declined to answer specific questions about the wiring of the camera in Sharp’s car.Rivera, who is currently the police director of the Penns Grove Police Department in New Jersey, said he has had his own issues with department servers and video evidence in the past. But he also said those issues always have to be documented internally and explained.“As police, we have to document everything. We have to justify our actions. We have to keep reports,” he said. “Yet we have access to this information and material and we don’t want to share it. It’s nonsensical.”Bumpass and her attorney initially pushed for an independent investigation into the incident by the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation. But in a Feb. 4, 2020, letter obtained by The Daily Beast, the agency declined to review the “suicide investigation” because “the incident has been investigated by a competent law enforcement agency.” The agency also cited the amount of time that had passed since the initial incident occurred, which at that point was 51 days.Bumpass said she’d been disappointed in the lack of clear answers and information, particularly from Sheriff Birkhead. Birkhead, who is Black, overwhelmingly won his 2018 election to office. His campaign website pledged “leadership that is transparent, accessible and accountable.” He also pledged to “share timely and accurate information” with the public.But Bumpass said the lack of details surrounding the death of her son has led her and her family and his friends to conclude that either Sharp or Osborne killed her son. “Nobody could come up to a conclusion where they could feel comfortable saying J’Mauri committed suicide,” she said.Even so, she conceded she was still unsure of a possible motive for the alleged murder. An independent investigation by her attorney, Allyn Sharp, charted out a possible one in the lawsuit—but although Bumpass thinks it's plausible, she isn't entirely certain about it. (Sharp did not respond to multiple requests for comment.)The lawsuit cites records that Deputy Sharp had previously arrested two distant cousins of J’Mauri on drug charges in Aug. 4, 2016, and March 29, 2017, and alleges Sharp made comments saying he knew the Bumpasses were running a “drug ring” and vowed to take them down. The two men at the center of the previous arrests, Timothy Bumpass Jr., 28, and Timothy Bumpass Sr., 50, did not respond to requests for comment.Federal court records show that Bumpass Sr. had previously been incarcerated for drug-related charges in the past and was arrested for a violation of probation on March 29, 2017, by the Durham County Sheriff’s Office. But the records do not specify the names of the officers involved in the arrest. According to federal court records, Bumpass Sr. was sentenced to five years in prison for the probation violation in November 2018.North Carolina Department of Public Safety records show Bumpass Jr. was arrested on drug possession and trafficking charges in Durham County on Aug. 4, 2016. According to local news reports, Bumpass Jr. was arrested again by the Durham County Sheriff’s Office on Aug. 4, 2017, for leaving the scene of an accident and attempting to elude police. The reports do not specify the names of the officers involved in the arrest.Bumpass said the men were cousins on the side of her son’s father, whom she divorced years before the incident, and that despite their being relatives, neither she nor her son had ever met them.Fraught as the saga is, and as unsure as she may be of why police would have taken her son’s life, her goal now is a simple one.“I want justice,” she said. “I want these officers to be convicted. I want the truth to come out.”Hope said he just wants to know how his friend died. “I want to know what really happened, because I don’t believe what they’re telling us,” he told The Daily Beast.New Video of Ronald Greene Arrest in Louisiana Is Just BrutalAfter watching recent reports of Black men like Ronald Greene being killed by police who later reportedly attempted to alter the facts of what happened in official narratives, Bumpass said she hasn’t stopped thinking about her son’s death and wants it to be recognized. “Nobody knows about Durham, North Carolina, going through the same thing they just went through with George Floyd,” she said.But mostly, she added, she wants the idea that her son killed himself over a simple traffic stop to be stricken from the record of his life.“I want that off of my son’s name.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

Cathie Wood says Elon Musk will eventually prove positive for bitcoin - and predicts central banks will begin adding crypto to their balance sheets

"He has encouraged a lot more conversation, a lot more analytical thinking. And I do believe he's going to become a part of the process," Wood said.

Taiwan's president said China interfered in and delayed its COVID-19 vaccine deal with Pfizer-BioNTech

Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen said in a tweet on Wednesday that Taiwan will "oppose attempts to exploit vaccine supply for political purposes."

As Russia tensions simmer, NATO conducts massive war games

As tensions with Russia simmer, thousands of NATO troops, several warships and dozens of aircraft are taking part in military exercises stretching across the Atlantic, through Europe and into the Black Sea region. It will test NATO’s ability to deploy troops from America and keep supply lines open. Already in recent years, the United States and its allies have deployed troops and equipment in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland to try to reassure those members neighboring Russia that their partners will ride to the rescue should they come under attack.

BLM co-founder quits movement's foundation amid controversy over $3m property portfolio

A Black Lives Matter co-founder has resigned from her role as executive director after hitting out at a "right-wing smear campaign" that revealed her $3 million housing portfolio. Patrisse Cullors, an integral figure of the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation, made the announcement on Thursday and will stand down today. "I've created the infrastructure and the support, and the necessary bones and foundation, so that I can leave," she said. "It feels like the time is right." Ms Cullors cited the release of her second book and a TV deal as the cause of her departure, but it comes after a heated controversy over the foundation's finances and her personal wealth. Despite describing herself as a “trained marxist'' Ms Cullors owns numerous multi-million dollar properties, including a recently purchased $1.4 million home in an affluent LA neighborhood. BLM said she had "received a total of $120,000 since the organisation's inception in 2013, for duties such as serving as spokesperson and engaging in political education work”.


Texas Sheet Cake

For the past few, oh I dunno…. decades the only real question for family gatherings is: who is going to make the Texas Sheet Cake? It’s goes without saying that this unassuming, pecan studded cake will be sliced up at the end of every family celebration. As sure as the sun will rise, ya know? So… who is going to make it?

The steady Texas Sheet Cake bakers in our clan are my dad, mom, and aunt Judy. Is one cake better than another? I’ll never tell but they all work from the same, chocolate-stained recipe card from our late Aunt Mary. We’ve learned, after a few well intentioned deviations, not to mess with Aunt Mary’s recipe. Don’t go thinking you can add peppermint extract to the cake, walnuts to the frosting, or god forbid a… fruit. You don’t mess with a good thing and if you do… I mean we’ll still eat it but we’ll shake out heads about it after our plates are clean.

It’s a crime that it’s taken me so long to share this cake with you. It’s classic Americana. It’s classic Wilson family shenanigans.

Let’s talk about a few things.

What is Texas Sheet Cake?

Texas sheet cake is a thin chocolate cake baked in a jelly roll pan. The cake batter is thin, making for a light and tender baked cake. What really sets a Texas Sheet Cake apart from other cakes is the stovetop cooked chocolate frosting made with melted butter, milk, chocolate, powdered sugar and, most importantly – pecans. The warm frosting is poured over warm cake creating a fudgy, undeniably special chocolate cake.

Texas Sheet Cake is known by many other names. Southern Living touts it as a funeral cake, which made me do a double take and made me extra thankful that we don’t wait for a death in the family to enjoy this cake. Some people know it as a Chocolate Sheath Cake or with a touch of cinnamon as a Mexican Chocolate Cake. Some attribute the cake to Lady Bird Johnson. Some to the popularity of a German Chocolate Cake recipe printed in a Dallas newspaper in the 1950’s. Texas Sheet Cake is one of those recipes that, because of its ease and deliciousness (thank you pecans and chocolate), just got around through recipe cards and church cookbooks and imprinted itself into so many of our family recipe arsenals.

What do you need to make Texas Sheet Cake?

• butter for the cake and frosting.

• cocoa for the cake and frosting.

• buttermilk (though sour cream also works wonderfully) and eggs

To start, whisk together the dry ingredients – flour, sugar, salt, and baking soda. Set aside, we have a bit of stovetop work to get to.

In a small saucepan, melt butter and whisk in cocoa and hot water.

Add the warmed cocoa/butter mixture to the dry ingredients and whisk to combine.

Add the buttermilk and beaten eggs and hand whisk the thin batter smooth.

Pour the cake batter into a greased jelly roll pan and carefully transfer to the oven (truly the hardest part of the recipe).

Bake until the cake is gently puffed and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out dry or with just a few moist crumbs. If the toothpick still has sticky batter, the cake needs a few minutes more.

While the cake bakes… guess what? More chocolate.

We’ll whisk together a warm chocolate and pecan glaze on the stovetop. Butter, cocoa, milk, powdered sugar, vanilla, and chopped pecans. It’s beyond. It’ll take all you’ve got to not eat the frosting with a spoon before the cake comes out of the oven.

When the baked cake emerges from the oven it’s topped with warm chocolate pecan frosting and as it all cools, the most magical thing happens.

The cake and frosting become one. There’s this perfectly tender cake topped with a chocolate pecan shell. In the center, where the cake and frosting meet is a fudgy equator that, as far as I can tell, is a thing of dreams (or, if you’re lucky, a thing of every family gathering).

You should need no further convincing.

In our family, this was the sort of cake that lived awkwardly in the pan, tilted and teetering in the refrigerator, for a day and a half. Each member of the family stealing moments at the open refrigerator to peel back the plastic wrap and sneak slivers with a butterknife.

I secretly hope this cake feels as nostalgic for you as it does me. If it doesn’t, maybe all this chocolate talk is enough to inspire a new tradition. Either way, I sincerely hope this cake finds it’s way into your oven.